Can You Shoot Up Prozac We Always Have Lowest Prices on Internet

How Long Diflucan System, How Long Diflucan System Paypal, 1000mg How Long Diflucan System, 50mg How Long Diflucan System, How Long Diflucan System Australia, 150mg How Long Diflucan System, 100mg How Long Diflucan System, How Long Diflucan System Canada, 10mg How Long Diflucan System, 200mg How Long Diflucan System, How Long Diflucan System Japan We Always Have Lowest Prices on Internet

Can You Shoot Up Prozac We Always Have Lowest Prices on Internet header image 2

How Long Diflucan System

July 16th, 2009 · 18 Comments · Peru's Andes Mountains

A rescue worker (NOT with the Red Cross) helps a woman in Arequipa whose llamas have died of extreme cold (Reuters)

I was on Twitter tonight when I learned from actress Qorianka How Long Diflucan System,  that the death toll in the Andes due to extreme cold is up to 250 children, reports the BBC's Dan Collyns:
Almost 250 children under the age of five have died in a wave of intensely cold weather in Peru.

Children die from pneumonia and other respiratory infections every year during the winter months particularly in Peru's southern Andes.

But this year freezing temperatures arrived almost three months earlier than usual, How Long Diflucan System paypal.

Experts blame climate change for the early arrival of intense cold which began in March. 1000mg How Long Diflucan System, Winter in the region does not usually begin until June.

The extreme cold, which has brought snow, hail, freezing temperatures and strong winds, has killed more children than recorded annually for the past four years, How Long Diflucan System.

A total of 246 under the age of five have died so far, only half way through the winter months.


Continue reading Collyns' story here, 50mg How Long Diflucan System.

This news sickens me because, How Long Diflucan System australia, as Collyns and others point out, the deaths are preventable. Cold spells of varying intensity are to be expected in the Andes; the country should have health procedures in place before winter gets underway, 150mg How Long Diflucan System.

In any other country, 100mg How Long Diflucan System, the Red Cross would be on the scene tending to victims and providing emergency services, but guess what. How Long Diflucan System, Peru's Red Cross is a private, family-owned business that operates according to its own idiosyncratic methods, not those of the International Red Cross/Red Crescent Society. The Peru Red Cross does virtually nothing during disasters and even less to prevent them, How Long Diflucan System canada.

Why can't the International Red Cross intervene and help establish a true Red Cross in Peru. 10mg How Long Diflucan System, Because the family that "owns" the Red Cross in Peru has registered the name with SUNAT and technically "owns" the Red Cross brand in the country.

If you think this is an outrage, join the club, 200mg How Long Diflucan System. The Peruvian government should intervene, How Long Diflucan System japan, rescind the name from private ownership and help get a real Red Cross established in Peru ASAP.

Meanwhile (back to the kids dying in the puna), Qorianka is helping to coordinate some sort of relief efforts from the United States. Click here for info on contacting her directly.

Also note that llamas and alpacas are dying in record numbers, as the opening Reuters photo shows.

Similar posts: Mrsa Tetracycline Resistance. Generic Synthroid Not As Effective. Pictures Of Colchicine. 50mg Zithromax Diaper Rash. Can Flagyl Cause Diarrhea paypal. Metronidazole Flagyl Order Fast Canada Mexico usa.
Trackbacks from: How Long Diflucan System. How Long Diflucan System. 100 Mg Clomid And Hcg Shot. 500mg Dry Skin With Retin A. 750mg Can Amoxicillin Cause A Rash. Retin A Recall Potency ebay.

Tags: ··

18 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Peruanista // Jul 16, 2009 at 10:49 pm

    Barbara, I grew up seeing how my people were abused and killed by powerful interests who run Peru’s politics and economy. I am aware of the suffering the Andean people have to endure. One of my last posts before my Youtube channel was censured -all my videos deleted- talked about how in the last 30 years the government of Peru is promoting an Indigenous genocide because of racism:

    http://peruanista.blogspot.com/2009/07/after-188-years-of-independence-peru.html

    “How would you feel if one American woman dies in every 416 child deliveries? What would you do if the entire population of women in Washington, DC, gets sterilized for life by the U.S. government? If you thought the 2,500 victims of Katrina was a sign of racism, imagine 3,500 people being killed every year due to government neglect.

    Is not happening in the United States -good for those of us who live here- but this is the tragic reality affecting the Indigenous people of Peru, where more Native children have died in 2009 of pneumonia and cold weather related diseases, than all of the victims of the swine H1N1 flu in the world combined.”

  • 2 Barb // Jul 16, 2009 at 11:40 pm

    I agree, Carlos, that the deaths in the Andes are part of a centuries-old pattern of neglect, one that has become business as usual in Peru. I am very concerned that Peru does not have a functioning emergency management corps, like a Red Cross. Climate-induced disasters are going to continue to rise throughout this century, and a mitigation plan will be needed in order to avert widening catastrophe.

    That might sound overblown to someone who hasn’t visited Peru, but when you live here (as you did) and you see the extreme geography and the poverty, it makes sense.

    I believe the Peruvian gov’t is starting to wake up to the fact that they must change their ways (the international community is shaming them). They just don’t know what the blank to do! So many incompetant people filling posts — some are uncaring, some are dumb and some want to help but have little training.

  • 3 Alpaca Farmgirl // Jul 17, 2009 at 7:14 am

    Oh, that is so sad. We worry so much about the people and animals in the Andes. They have shepherded our wonderful alpacas for thousands of years. Would love to help them out, it’s heartbreaking.

  • 4 Seldom Scene // Jul 18, 2009 at 8:40 pm

    This is mindboggling, but having seen firsthand how things operate in Peru I shouldn’t be shocked. Anyone who wants to help should check into this great program- they have been on the scene quickly after several emergencies in Peru. http://www.quechuabenefit.org

  • 5 Barb // Jul 18, 2009 at 8:47 pm

    Thanks for stopping by, Seldom Scene, and for giving info about the NGO. It is hard to read about this stuff and not be able to help in some way, so I am glad to feature links to organizations that are making a difference.

    I tried to leave a message on your blog but it only accepts comments from certain kinds of accounts, so I couldn’t. Oh well. The felting work your are doing is very lovely. (Readers, check it out.)

  • 6 Deborah // Jul 19, 2009 at 8:24 am

    A medical outreach sponsored by the http://www.quechabenefit.org is leaving for the high country of Peru(alpaca/llama country) in early Nov. A team of 5 physicians ,2 dentist ,1 nurse practitioner,3 nurses and a 4th year medical student , board member Lindy Huber and her daughter will be going. Any one interested in making donations for medications and supplies should contact the link above. Although we are receiving some medications from the U.S. to take with us many items will need to be purchased in Peru for the outreach. While we all have experienced the economic recession these herdsman of our livestock live in challenging conditions beyond anything we can imagine. Any assistance that can be offered by the alpaca community will bless the villages we will serve. Please contact http://www.quechabenefit.org today with your tax deductible contribution.

  • 7 Barb // Jul 19, 2009 at 11:28 am

    Deborah,
    I tried to click on the link this morning and it wouldn’t take me to the page. I don’t know if it’s down or what.

    But I did find this info about Quechua Benefit, which is a 501C3 based in the U.S. and which has raised about $58,000 for Andean people so far. Alpaca breeders in the US formed the group as a way to give back to the indigenous people who have nurtured alpacas for thousands of years.

    It appears that the group partners with different outreach efforts, including one by a nun in Peru, but it isn’t religious. The money goes to help the people. Here’s more: http://www.alpacas.com/AlpacaLibrary/ExpandingQuechuaBenefit.aspx

    Deborah: could you check that link you provided and make sure it’s working?

  • 8 Mike Safley // Jul 21, 2009 at 3:40 pm

    I am a founding director of Quechua Benefit. We have been operating in Peru for more than 12 years and we have raised more than $1,000,000 for programs that seal directly with the Quechua people. Please visit our website http://www.quechuabenefit.org.

  • 9 Barb // Jul 22, 2009 at 10:37 am

    Thanks, Mike, for providing the working link and for correcting the $ amount raised.

    Can you comment on the Nov. trip that Deborah mentions? Will the team only be going to the town near Arequipa? People who are reading this want to help the areas affected by extreme cold now, I believe, although helping with longer range goals is certainly an interest also.

  • 10 Citizen Journalists Respond to Cold Deaths in Andes | An American in Lima // Aug 2, 2009 at 2:08 pm

    [...] also was honored that Arellano quoted from my July 16 post (”250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes”) on the lack of response from Peru’s Red Cross, an agency that should be on the scene and [...]

  • 11 Global Voices Online » Peru: Deaths Due to Cold Temperatures Continue in Puno // Aug 2, 2009 at 8:15 pm

    [...] to those who want to help the people of Puno. Barbara Drake, an ex-pat from the United States, writes in her blog An American in [...]

  • 12 Peru: Cold Temperatures Continue in Puno :: Elites TV // Aug 2, 2009 at 8:29 pm

    [...] to those who want to help the people of Puno. Barbara Drake, an ex-pat from the United States, writes in her blog An American in [...]

  • 13 The July Just Posts « collecting tokens // Aug 7, 2009 at 1:43 am

    [...] in Lima with Peru’s Politicians Lock Horns with Scientists, Deny Crisis as Water Shortage Looms, 250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes: Death Toll Keeps Climbing and Cemetery Dog, Buried City of Yungay, [...]

  • 14 Cold Spaghetti » Blog Archive » July Just Posts for a Just World // Aug 7, 2009 at 2:04 am

    [...] in Lima with Peru’s Politicians Lock Horns with Scientists, Deny Crisis as Water Shortage Looms, 250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes: Death Toll Keeps Climbing and Cemetery Dog, Buried City of Yungay, [...]

  • 15 Andy // Nov 16, 2009 at 10:12 pm

    Thank you so much for posting this for it is 100% true. What’s worse than there being no red cross is that no one living in Lima seems to mind it at all. I’ve been living here for 2 and a half years and people in the city see this on the news and act as if its a another country and not their own. We should have been worrying about THIS but unfortunately the minister of health was too focused on the “swine flu”

  • 16 Best of the 2009 Just Posts: The Semifinalists « collecting tokens // Feb 27, 2010 at 9:54 pm

    [...] 250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes: Death Toll Keeps Climbing by Barbara Drake at An American in Lima [...]

  • 17 Cold Spaghetti :: The Best of the Just Posts for 2009: Semi-finalists! // Feb 27, 2010 at 10:54 pm

    [...] 250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes: Death Toll Keeps Climbing by Barbara Drake at An American in Lima [...]

  • 18 Vote for the Best Just Posts of 2009 « collecting tokens // Mar 14, 2010 at 11:09 pm

    [...] 250 Children Dead of Cold in Andes: Death Toll Keeps Climbing by Barbara Drake at An American in Lima [...]